((Bells Breath)) - Glockenatem

Eine Surround Sound Installation
im Turmsaal des Ulmer Münster

In den Dimensionen des riesigen,
übermächtigen Münster kann sich ein einzelner Mensch leicht verlieren.

...spiritueller Raum wird von manchen Besuchern oft nicht wahrgenommen..

((Bells Breath)) lädt den Besucher ein,
sich vom gewohnten Weg abzuwenden
um Ruhe zu finden..

Die Musik,
auf der Basis der Glocken des Münsters,
bezieht sich auf den Moment der Stille...

Die 4-kanalige Audioinstallation hüllt den Besucher ein,
gibt ihm Zeit, zuzuhören
und sich zu verlieren...

Die Installation ((Bells Breath)) ermöglicht eine zeitgenössische Auseinandersetzung
mit dem Kirchenraum.
Sie ist die kontemplative Antwort auf die Frage
nach einem modernen Blick auf Gott.

1
1

Musik

Die Musik von Bells Breath ist ab sofort als Streng limitierte Auflage in ihrem Plattenladen oder bei Ihrem digitalen Musikanbieter verfügbar. Sie können die LP oder den Download gerne auch hier erwerben.

“Bells Breath” transforms the tolling of the bells in the Ulm Minster into a work of sound art. This project by Andreas Usenbenz and Dorothee Köhl was created for the 125th anniversary of the minster spire’s completion and was presented in the form of an audio installation inside the minster in the fall of 2015.
There are 13 bells in the bell tower, ten of which are in use. Each bell has its own size and pitch, and each has its own function.
“Bells Breath” strips away that function, creating a new form of auditory experience. The moment of the bell tolling has been recorded, the tone stretched and the individual tones are layered on top of each other. The sound installation was situated on the ground floor inside the minster, beneath the bell frame. A platform for people to step or sit on created a spacial frame of reference, the sound was triggered by the listeners by pressing a button.
When dealing with this work, it is helpful to have a brief look at Minimal Art. In the early 1960ies, a new understanding of art was being developed in contrast to abstract painting. Part of it was an abandonment of categories that had been considered essential until then, like the aesthetic experience or the artists signature style. Industrially produced materials were now being used, every day objects were stripped bare of their function. Experiencing art turned into an experience of self-awareness on behalf of the audience.
Sculptor Tony Smith was aware of the importance of this type of experience as early as the mid-fifties. He took his students on a nocturnal journey on the still uncompleted New Jersey Turnpike. Driving down the road lacking crash barriers and road markings didn’t serve any functional purpose. Instead, the dark and the passing industrial complexes appeared in a different state of perception. It’s this experience that Smith regarded as having an artistic quality.
This kind of quality can be described further using the “Mirrored Cubes” by Robert Morris. The installation consists of four mirrored cubes. They are positioned in a square, one edge length apart from each other, therefore eliminating the element of composition. The surface, as perceived by the audience, is only a reflection of the surroundings and of itself. Artwork and location become an inseparable one. What the audience experiences is an amplified perception of itself and of the spacial situation here and now.
The here and now are two elements that appear on different levels in “Bell’s Breath”. The work strongly relates to the location, the tower hall right beneath the bell frame. At the same time, the sounds’ original function is being eliminated by prolonging and layering the different sounds. This, together with the audience’s presence in the space creates a new experience of perception.

REWIEW by A Closer Listen:
Ten bells, ten recordings, three tracks, one fine album.
We’ve been waiting on Bells Breath for quite some time,
ever since the sleep version appeared on Klanggold last April. This is the “parent” recording, available on clear vinyl. And what a lovely sound it makes.
Those who live around the Ulm Minster are certainly familiar with the sound of the bells, but they’ve never heard them like this. Andreas Usenbenz stretches the recordings, doubling them over and soldering them together until they spread and set like sonic glue. The results became an installation, placed in a room directly below the bells, where visitors might hear the sound in each in turn ~ or perhaps, if lucky, together.
A church bell is meant to do more than call people to worship. At one time, the bell was a town’s primary means of telling time. As such, the importance of the bells cannot be overstated. Spirituality was conveyed through chimes, but the workday world was set in motion as well. Toward the end of the day, citizens yearned to hear the tolling that indicated the end of a shift. Modern societies have more accurate ways to tell time, but something has been lost in the transition: a dependence on sonic cues, an invitation to listen. Bells Breath is both a reflection of and a reaction to time. No longer needed as watch or alarm, the Ulm Minster bells can be appreciated for their musical qualities. In addition, the time-stretched quality of these recordings underlines the subjective experience of time, a subject most recently covered by Simon Garfield in Timekeepers. While listening, it’s easy to lose track of time, due to the absence of frequent markers; only when unadorned bells appear does the listener experience the now as opposed to the chronal drift.
The first clear toll arrives early in the second track (“Study IV”), but is immediately followed by stutters and echoes. The effect is like a soft ricochet. One can imagine sitting in the installation, closing one’s eyes, and imagining clock hands, gears and bell clappers separating themselves from their homes and floating around the room. In this sense, the project is related to Peals’ Seltzer, also recorded in a clock tower, albeit with the addition of live instrumentation. Each recording looks backward in time through architecture while transcending the idea of time itself. When it all ends, one grows grateful for those sentinels of time, watching over us from towers and spires, and wonders if perhaps they know more than we do, having lasted for generations before us and likely to outlive us as well. (Richard Allen)

REWIEW by CHAIN DLK:
“Bells Breath” is such a pure and simple concept that it is difficult to either analyse or fault.
The sound of the bells of Ulm Minster, the tallest church in the world, has been digitally stretched and then layered. That’s it; plenty of bells but no whistles, no frills, very little further trickery, principally just the bell sound, inflated and resonant, mesmerising and soporific. Though it’s theoretically minimalist, the tones are rich and broad and very warm, capable of filling a space wholeheartedly. The pieces were initially created as part of a 2015 art installation within the minster itself, but out of context, as simply audio, it’s a sound with fantastic power.
The main album is split into three studies. Each has a subtly different character; “Study III” is the simplest and purest. “Study IV” is somewhat darker and moodier, with very faint hints of percussive sound, distant ‘real time’ bell-ringing and occasional found sound ambience. The comparatively brief seven minutes of “Study II” sits between the two, still with dark tonality but a cleaner sound with fewer distant distractions.
As a digital bonus there’s also an hour-long “sleep version” of “Study III”, though it’s scarcely any more ambient than the others and personally I don’t see why you couldn’t fall asleep to any of these pieces.
Initially conceived as an in situ installation, and released on Klanggold who are themselves based in Ulm,

REVIEW: SIGIL OF BRASS:
Bell’s Breath transforms the tolling of the bells in the Ulm Minster into a work of sound art. This project by Andreas Usenbenz was created for the 125th anniversary of the minster spire’s completion and was presented in the form of an audio installation inside the minster in the fall of 2015.
Andreas Usenbenz is self-taught. Since 2000, he is working in sound-art between field recording, composition and improvisation. For his work Usenbenz primarily uses sounds from his immediate surroundings. These sounds can be sampled directly from the environment. They serve as starting material for his compositions. Drone Music or musique concrète, Ambient are genres which are heavily connected to Andreas work.
Andreas Usenbenz has taken a raw recording of the tolling of the minster bells at Ulm and created a piece that is disassociated with the emotion extolled by the original master. But this is no remix. The peal of the minster bells are welcome to most, but grate to others. With Bells Breath, Usenbenz re-frames a sound and emotion that is pan-European in to a work that is refreshingly astute and modern.
Using layer upon layer of process sound, Usenbenz forms an ambient piece where artwork and location become an inseparable one. What the audience experiences is an amplified perception of itself.
Very minimal and, dare I say it, very cool – “Bells Breath” references the minimalist artworks that came out of the late 1960’s. A new understanding of art was being developed in contrast to abstract painting. Part of it was an abandonment of categories that had been considered essential until then, like the aesthetic experience or the artists signature style. Industrially produced materials were now being used, every day objects were stripped bare of their function. Experiencing art turned into an experience of self-awareness on behalf of the audience.
If you are familiar with the genre of minimal music – this album, ‘Bells Breath’ is a stand out example of the genre. Not too clever, not too flat: just right.

"10. Oktober - 18.November 2015
Die Vernissage beginnt um 17 Uhr"

− Ausstellungszeitraum
Inhaltlicher Bezug

40 Tage lang weilt Mose auf dem Berg Sinai, um das Gesetz zu empfangen. Mose ist Hirte und begibt sich auf den Weg um seine Schafe zu hüten. Als er jedoch von weitem einen brennenden Dornbusch erblickt, bewegt er sich von seinem gewohnten Weg ab und will wissen was vor sich geht. Aus dem brennenden Dornbusch spricht die Stimme Gottes zu ihm, die ihn auffordert, seine Schuhe auszuziehen, da er sich auf heiligem Boden befindet.

Darum fordern wir den Gast auf, beim Betreten der Installation die Schuhe abzulegen. Beim Aus- ziehen der Schuhe legt der Mensch einen Teil seiner Schutzhülle ab und wird dabei verletzlich, empfindlicher und empfänglicher.

In den Dimensionen des riesigen, übermächtigen Münster kann sich ein einzelner Mensch leicht verlieren. Als spiritueller Raum wird er von manchen Besuchern oft nicht wahrgenommen, manchmal sogar mit Blitzgewittern zu unpassenden Zeiten mißachtet.

Die Installation ((Bells Breath)) lädt den Besucher ein, sich wie Mose vom gewohnten Weg weg- zubewegen, zu lösen, sich Zeit zu nehmen um Platz und Ruhe zu finden in all dem Tumult, der ihn umgibt. Der Besucher erhält die Möglichkeit 40 Tage lang einen Ort der Ruhe aufzusuchen. Indem er sich auf das Podest begibt, betritt er eine Art geschützten Raum, der scheinbar losgelöst vom Eigentlichen existiert.

Die 4-kanalige Audioinstallation, welche ihren Klang über die 4 Seitenteile des Podestes in den Raum abgibt, hüllt den Besucher ein, gibt ihm Zeit, zuzuhören und sich in den Schallwellen der Komposition zu verlieren. Die Musik, auf der Basis der Glocken des Münsters, bezieht sich auf den Moment der Stille. Die Installation ((Bells Breath)) ermöglicht eine zeitgenössische Auseinandersetzung mit dem Kirchenraum. Sie ist die kontemplative Antwort auf die neu zu entdeckende Frage nach einem modernen Blick auf Gott.

Auch Jesus wurde 40 Tage und 40 Nächte lang von Gott in der Wüst versucht. In der heutigen Zeit sind wir vielen Versuchungen jeden einzelnen Tag ausgesetzt. Viele Menschen fasten, indem sie bewusst auf Alkohol, Süßigkeiten oder Facebook verzichten. Diese Zeit ist eine Zeit der Wahrneh- mung, des Zuhörens, des Verzichtes und der Erfahrung mit sich selbst. Die Langsamkeit und Ent- schleunigung, die die Komposition in den Raum abgibt, soll den Besucher dazu veranlassen, Ruhe zu finden um im besten Fall seinen eigenen inneren Raum wahrzunehmen.

Projektbeschreibung

Die Installation verwandelt die Turmhalle zunächst in einen Raum der Stille. In der Mitte der Turmhalle befindet sich ein »entschleunigter Raum« mit einem erhöhten Podest und einem weichen Teppich. Um sich auf das flache Podest zu begeben, sollten die Besucher im Münster ihre Schuhe ausziehen. Alternativ können sich die Besucher auf den Rand setzen. Die Klanginstallation beginnt sobald ein Besucher diese per »Knopfdruck« startet. Die Klanginstallation basiert auf dem Klang der Münsterglocken, welche im Vorfeld aufgenommen und zu einer Musikalischen Komposition verarbeitet wurden. Die Installation lädt die Besucher einsymbolisiert durch das Ausziehen der Schuhe ihren Alltag zu verlassen und einen Raum der Ruhe zu betreten. Die Besucher verweilen in diesem Raum mit völlig unterschiedlichen Personen und erfassen dabei die Dimension des Gebäudes klanglich und räumlich.

Ziel der Installation ist das aufeinander Zugehen und das gemeinsame Erleben im Zusammen- hang mit dem vorgegebenen Raum, dem Münster. Der wirkliche Teppich wird zum Klangteppich und öffnet den Zugang zu einer Wahrnehmung, die Menschen jeden Alters und jeder Religion erleben können unabhängig von der vollen Stunde oder von Gottesdiensten. Die Besucher erfahren in Achtsamkeit die Klänge und die Reaktionen des Raumes darauf. Die Installation ist eng mit dem umgebenden Raum verbunden, aber nicht auf das Münster beschränkt. Auch andere Räume im Münster wie die Bessererkapelle oder die Neidhardtkapelle sind be- spielbar. Der kontemplative Gedanke den Raum und die Dimension erfahrbar zu machen kann transportiert werden.

Video Teaser

Das Team

Dorothee Köhl

Dorothee Köhl

Idee, Konzept, Grafik

Grafik-Designerin, Studium an der Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Nürnberg – Malerei und Grafik-Design Seit 2000 – büro für gestaltung.köhl

Andreas Usenbenz

Andreas Usenbenz

Idee, Konzept, Fieldrecordings, Komposition

Diplom Audio Engineer (sae), Sounddesigner, Komponist, Klangkünstler. Betreibt seit 2010 die Klangmanufaktur in Ulm und seit über 10 Jahren in Ulms experimenteller Musikszene zuhause. Er komponierte für mehrere natio- nale Tanz- u. Kunstperformances und arbeitete mit versch. Künstler der Live-Elektronik Szene zusammen.

Projektförderung

Projektförderung

78%

Das Projekt wurde bisher zu großen Teilen von der Stadt Ulm gefördert. Wir sind jedoch immer noch auf der Suche nach weiteren Sponsoren, die uns mit ihren Mitteln die Möglichkeit geben, das Projekt bis in die letzte Phase zu realisieren.

ULMLOGOcable4loewenkoehllichtspieler4000_blk

Projektstatus

Recent Posts / View All Posts

20170123-_1350023

Bells Breath: Tonträger

| Allgemein | No Comments
Seit dem 17.02.2017 ist Bells Breath und zwei weitere Klangstudien als streng limitierte Vinyl Edition erhältlich. Für den weltweiten Vertrieb hat sich der Kölner Musikdistributor A-Musik zur verfügung gestellt. Somit...
bb4

Bells Breath bei Radio freeFM

| Allgemein | No Comments

    Andreas Usenbenz ist Diplom Audio Engineer, Sounddesigner, Komponist, und Klangkünstler. Er betreibt seit 2010 die Klangmanufaktur in Ulm und ist seit über 10 Jahren in Ulms experimenteller Musikszene…

bb

Ready to Go!

| Allgemein | No Comments

Die Installation steht und ist bereit für ihre stillen Zuhörer. Morgen ist die Vernissage!

bbvinylmockup Kopie

Das Crowdfunding Projekt ist Online

| Allgemein | No Comments

Leider reichte die Finanzierungssumme der Stadt und der Sponsoren nicht mehr für einen Tonträger. Daher müssen wir selbst aktiv werden und haben heute ein Crowdfunding Projekt veröffentlicht. Wem Crowdfunding nichts…